Confronting the Fact that most Africans are Depressed-How did it happen?

African American art: visual metaphor:

“To deny someone’s feelings or experiences it to literally deny their reality.”
Danu Morrigan, You’re Not Crazy, It’s Your Mother: 

          Seriously in Africa, we love to prove that we fine, okay and a bit emotionless because we are Blacks. Coming in terms with depression is “Foreign” and it isn’t part of our culture. I ‘d like to ask you, why do you think that the rate of suicide in Africa  keeps increasing by the day? You know why…because they are depressed. You don’t need to sad before you are depressed. A lot of stress is depression,  but the African mentality is that a true Black man should be able to cope with stress and understand the struggles of what it means to be living in Africa.-Being African
In Africa, most of the time our emotions do not matter. To further explain, many parent’s aren’t ready to listen to the little talks their children have to say or notice the sudden behaviors in people.

          Aside from that, the society is brainwashed  with the stereotype that all men are strong and shouldn’t be subjected to emotions. They are hence not allowed to express themselves or break down, and with this we have come to have many mad men around who are occupied and consumed with so much anger. Domestic violence is a form of depression…who agrees with me? .
In most African Society, expressing your emotions to outsiders is like exposing the sacred hood of your home. And this is why a lot prefer to walk around carrying happy sad faces.
Do you ever wonder why you ‘d hear that a close friend, neighbor or family member committed suicide or died of a particular ailment that they never discussed with anyone? It’s because the society has made it clear that they do not care and wouldn’t like to listen to their problems because they have theirs, but if we stop hiding in the shadows and voice out a lot harm would be avoided rather than  asking questions later,  like how did it happen?

25 Comments Add yours

  1. toksdavid says:

    You pointed out a very good issue…. Depression, alot of us go through it and will just walk around like nothing happened or is happening. But one thing i would like to ask is can depression be totally cured?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Oluwanifemi says:

      Thankz for commenting…that’s true…there are a lot of masked faces around. To ur question about depression being cured… I don’t think Depression can really be cured bcoz it takes a long tym to heal…I feel u can embrace Depression and make it an anchor for doing something meaningful…lyk being a form of inspiration…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. toksdavid says:

        Yea, i thought as much… But really can someone who is depressed be an inspiration without involving their depressed state in whatever they do? I doubt though

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Oluwanifemi says:

        I blv a depressed psn can… I dnt knw if ‘m ryt…but I av observed dat most people in the arts-artists, musicians, writers and so on at one tym in der lives hz experienced pain

        Like

      3. Oluwanifemi says:

        Some of dem have put life in tge things dy av achieved today by recycling dat depression in a form which dy can see and potray for odas to feel

        Like

      4. Oluwanifemi says:

        But b4 one can make something out of depression, you have to embrace it

        Like

      5. toksdavid says:

        Yea, you are right. I’ve gotten the answer, thank you!

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Researches have shown that people can recover fully from depression. With effective psychotherapy and medication, people diagnosed with depression can live a normal life. Depression is different for each individual, and the treatment regimen is often tailor based on the type of depression and person.

      Reference: Townsend, 2015

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Oluwanifemi says:

        Thank u for the Information 😊

        Like

      2. toksdavid says:

        Thank you Wesley

        Liked by 1 person

  2. This is exactly what I have been looking for. You literally just shared my thoughts, please let’s have a good discussion on how we can take this further.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oluwanifemi says:

      Thnkz so much for commenting… true…Depression isn’t Fiction…but a lot thinkz it dznt exist

      Like

  3. Nedoux says:

    Hi Oluwanifemi,

    Thank you for sharing this post, it’s a very relevant topic.

    I find that there’s a common misconception that depression is simply equivalent to acute feelings of sadness due to internal or external stress. It is actually much more than that; a mental illness that causes chemical imbalances that distort the mood causing feelings of anxiety, hopelessness, worthlessness, amongst other things…

    Based on this misconception, I have to disagree with your stance that “most Africans are depressed”. The word “Most” signifies a larger proportion in comparison to the whole.

    Another common misconception is that all suicidal persons are depressed and by extension mentally ill. Not every mentally ill person is suicidal and not every suicidal person is mentally ill.

    I disagree with you, domestic abuse is actually a form of oppression and should not be excused with depression.

    You are absolutely right, society would benefit from stepping out of the shadows of denial because depression isn’t a foreign concept. It’s far better to give emotional support to those who need it, because life can be hard sometimes.

    Your blog is great, well done. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Oluwanifemi says:

      Thanks for your comments 😊…You’ve educated me on many things I haven’t even differentiated.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Nice comment.
      Those who go through domestic abuse could also be emotionally depressed.
      also, continuous oppression causes depression.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. funkeolotu says:

    This post is very important especially with men thinking that showing emotions is for weak hearted people, and also with parents not listening to their children, it’s very disheartening.
    But I see growth in this part,African parents are getting better at listening.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Oluwanifemi says:

      Thanks for commenting Funke…It’s just the stereotyped society that has come to impose on men the attitude of being emotionless to be become hard

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Adeyooye Fisayo says:

    To be honest,this post reflects what has been going on in my mind lately. Very few people are genuinely happy and sharing one’s feelings paints one has been weak. How many people even have the time to listen or share the pain of others? People just don’t want to listen to u even if u always listen to them. Fact is,that a person acts strong doesn’t mean he’s always strong,that a person makes others laugh so hard that they forget their sorrows doesn’t mean they are truly happy….Lately,I heard of a really talented comedian who committed suicide and that really got me thinking.
    One way I think we can help out is to notice sad faces and lend listening ears,let’s be more sensitive to people around us and try our possible best to brighten sad faces around us. Who knows,we just might save a life!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oluwanifemi says:

      Thank u so much Fisayo for commenting…You’ve said it all…I feel Depression is a sensitive Topic we need to address in Africa

      Like

  6. I have an issue with mental illness. I nearly tackled it recently on my blog. Everyday on the streets of Nairobi I have to see a person talking to himself. A majority are men. Dirty, neglected and unkempt. Nobody bothers.
    Depression if left unchecked can often lead to mental illness. It is because in Africa we always put up a facade of toughness no wonder this occurence. We don’t value psychatrists and being treated for our depression.
    African men are expected to be tough. So what you get is men pushed so much by life’s issues to the extent of going mad. It is a sad sight seeing these mentally ill people on our streets conversing with God knows who.
    Thanks for these thought provoking posts. Perhaps I could do a guest post here?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Oluwanifemi says:

      Thnkz Lorna…you’ve captured a lot about depression & mental illness. In Africa, it’s a serious issue dat Africans overlook-Not all working men are sane…You can always guest post on d Blog. ologunorisanifemi@gmail.com

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I definitely will, soon 🙂

        Like

  7. This topic is really important. I’ve talked about this with a friend.
    Most time people often confused depression with being down.They are entirely two different things, being down is a temporary feeling that will go away.
    But it could move further to depression, if it’s continuous.constant worrying could also cause it.
    Depression are of different levels; it’s quite easy to get over the mild one if you look more on the positive side.
    When you’re depressed, you feel worthless,frustrated.
    people are quick to dismiss it, and it could happen to anyone irrespective of age

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oluwanifemi says:

      Dats true…d best fin is to identify wat stage if depression one is in order to curb it

      Like

  8. Jimmy says:

    I seriously love your website.. Excellent colors &
    theme. Did you create this amazing site yourself?
    Please reply back as I’m trying to create my very own website and would like to know where you got this from
    or what the theme is named. Thanks!

    Like

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